Calembredaines & Coquecigrues

historicaltimes:

Vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, female samurai warrior of the upper bushi class in feudal Japan. Late 1800’s.

historicaltimes:

Vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, female samurai warrior of the upper bushi class in feudal Japan. Late 1800’s.

(via elucipher)

preliminarygaieties:

French medical students and their mistresses.

Gavarni, “Oeuvres choisies de Gavarni : études de moeurs contemporaines” (1847), translated by and screencapped from F. Pallualt’s “Medical Students in England and France 1815-1858” 

(via greencrook)

Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s poems by Edmund Dulac - “The Raven”, “To Helene”, “Alone”, “Lenore”, “To One in Paradise”, “Annabel Lee”

(Source: saltatio-crudelitatis, via elucipher)

thebeardsnotes:

Skeletal Creatures Carved Out Of Everyday Objects

Artist - Maskull Lasserre 

(via sea-change)

fuckyeahmodernflapper:


Street gramophone player. London, 1920.

fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Street gramophone player. London, 1920.

(via yukidoll)

mererecorder:

Tricheirousa costume by KasiaKonieczka
blackpaint20:

Eros & Thanatos (detail shot), hand-cut black paper, consisting of hundreds of individually cut parts, 2008, by Kako Ueda 

blackpaint20:

Eros & Thanatos (detail shot), hand-cut black paper, consisting of hundreds of individually cut parts, 2008, by Kako Ueda 

(via calantheandthenightingale)

aarcadien:

Salvador Dali – Ménagère (Cutlery Set), 1957
Six pieces (silver-gilt) comprising of two forks, two knives and two enameled spoons.

aarcadien:

Salvador Dali – Ménagère (Cutlery Set), 1957

Six pieces (silver-gilt) comprising of two forks, two knives and two enameled spoons.

(via elucipher)

jacobrobertprice:

Goodnight. on Flickr.

“Holy places are dark places. It is life and strength, not knowledge and words, that we get in them. Holy wisdom is not clear and thin like water, but thick and dark like blood.”

—   Till We Have Faces, C.S. Lewis 

(Source: celzmccelz, via sea-change)

morgan-leigh:

theparisreview:

In 1934, Columbia University moved its twenty-two miles of books to the newly-built Butler Library. By means of a really long slide.

True story, they had to do this because the architect who built the first library (Low Library) forgot to factor in the weight of the books. THAT PARABLE IS ACTUALLY TRUE, IT HAPPENED AT COLUMBIA.

morgan-leigh:

theparisreview:

In 1934, Columbia University moved its twenty-two miles of books to the newly-built Butler Library. By means of a really long slide.

True story, they had to do this because the architect who built the first library (Low Library) forgot to factor in the weight of the books. THAT PARABLE IS ACTUALLY TRUE, IT HAPPENED AT COLUMBIA.

autarque:

The Fugitive Futurist, Gaston Quiribet, 1924

autarque:

The Fugitive Futurist, Gaston Quiribet, 1924

(via louisefairweather)

l7d:

ratustuff:
 Yves Pires - French sculptor..

l7d:

ratustuff:

 Yves Pires - French sculptor..

(via sea-change)

“There is within American literature and cinema a subgenre of horror focused on buildings, buildings that are themselves the sources of evil, without ghosts or ghouls, but which, through some flaw of design — some peculiar arrangement of space and mass, some technology gone awry — manifest a malign awareness that targets [their] occupants. It’s an old thread. The gloomy gothic pile in Edgar Allen Poe’s ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ (1839) draws on still earlier models, notably Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto (1764). But where Walpole’s building is a setting, Poe’s is an actor. The result is that … masonry is destiny, and [the] poor [occupants of the house] never had a chance. In the end, [they] and the house go down together. [The] thing these stories do, particularly the sentient-house variety, is tease out one of the grand themes of modern architecture. Many modern architects directly compared their buildings to living organisms, but few architects have pushed this biological analogy so far as to imagine that a building could really be alive and willful. A building may be like an organism — the architect might even call it one — but we all know, the architect included, that it isn’t, not really. Poe, Jackson and Siddons, however, take us across this threshold to a place where buildings are not just alive, but aware and willful — like us, but not quite.”